Papyrus Bremner Rhind – BM EA 10188 (Ptolemaic Period at Deir el-Medina)

Spell of binding Apophis

Recitation: Bind the bound ones! Bind Apophis, that enemy of Re! You are not to know what is done to you, Apophis. Turn back, you, testimony is against you. The one who retreats in his moment, he damages himself when his throat inhales. Take heed, bound one! You are bound by Horus, you are tied up by Re, you will not become erect, you will not ejaculate, you will not be far from under his fingers, you are hurt by Re, you are tied up by Horus who is in Mekhentyirty.

Own translation from Faulkner, R. O. (1933), The Papyrus Bremner-Rhind (British Museum No. 10188), Bruxelles: Fondation Égyptologique Reine Élisabeth and Faulkner, R. O. (1937), ‘The Bremner-Rhind Papyrus III: D. The Book of Overthrowing aApep’, JEA 23, 166-185.

Colledge, S. L. (2015), The Process of Cursing in Ancient Egypt. PhD thesis. University of Liverpool. Available at: https://www.academia.edu/29127849/The_Process_of_Cursing_in_Ancient_Egypt(Accessed: 19/2/17)

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Tomb of Ankhtyfy (First Intermediate Period at Mo’alla)

As for any ruler who will rule in Mo’alla, who will do an evil or bad thing against this coffin, or against any cultic objects of this tomb, his arm will be chopped off for Hemen in his processions of the District Festival, his arm will be chopped off for Hemen in his processions of the Eastern Side Festival, his arm will be chopped off for Hemen in his processions of the Food Festival, his arm will be chopped off for Hemen in his processions of the Eternal Servant Festival, his arm will be chopped off for Hemen in his processions of the Great Feather Festival, his slaughter is presented (to) Hemen on the day of the Eternal Servant Festival, all of his possessions are presented (to) Hemen, and his heirs will be inherited (by) him.

Own translation from Vandier, J. (1950), Mo’alla: La Tombe d’Ankhtifi et la Tombe de Sebekhotep. Bibliothèque d’Étude XVIII, Cairo: IFAO, 206 and Willems, H. (1990), ‘Crime, Cult and Capital Punishment (Mo’alla Inscription 8)’, JEA 76, 27-54.

Colledge, S. L. (2015), The Process of Cursing in Ancient Egypt. PhD thesis. University of Liverpool. Available at: https://www.academia.edu/29127849/The_Process_of_Cursing_in_Ancient_Egypt (Accessed: 19/2/17)

Papyrus Chester Beatty VII AKA BM EA 10687 (19th Dynasty)

A mouth against a mouth, a tooth against a tooth, Re, [ward off] the venom! The scorpion which I have made with clay, a replica of turquoise which I have put [on…]… of hdn plants so I (can) release the difficulties of the body. Come to me when (this) speech is with [me]: “I am Horus who made you! You will depart, scorpion!”

Own translation from Gardiner, A. H. (1935), Hieratic Papyri in the British Museum. Third Series. Chester Beatty Gift, London: British Museum Press, pl 35 and Borghouts, J. F. (1978), Ancient Egyptian Magical Texts, Leiden: Brill, 72.

Colledge, S. L. (2015), The Process of Cursing in Ancient Egypt. PhD thesis. University of Liverpool. Available at: https://www.academia.edu/29127849/The_Process_of_Cursing_in_Ancient_Egypt(Accessed: 19/2/17)

Tomb of Hesi (Sixth Dynasty at Saqqara)

As for anyone who will enter this tomb after he has eaten abominations which the akh abominates (or) after he has copulated with women; I will be judged with him in the council of the Great God.

Own translation from Silverman, D. P. (2000), ‘The Threat-Formula and Biographical Text in the Tomb of Hezi at Saqqara’, in JARCE 37, 1-13.

Colledge, S. L. (2015), The Process of Cursing in Ancient Egypt. PhD thesis. University of Liverpool. Available at: https://www.academia.edu/29127849/The_Process_of_Cursing_in_Ancient_Egypt (Accessed: 19/2/17)

Ostracon Deir el-Medina 1057

Hail to you, Re-Horakhty, father of the gods! Hail to you, the seven Hathors who are adorned in ribbons of bright red linen! Hail to you, all the gods of the sky and the earth! Come, so that so-and-so born of so-and-so will come after me like a cow after pasture, like a maidservant after her children, like a herdsman after his herd. If they fail to make her come after me, I <will> set [fire to Bu]siris and I will burn <Osiris>.

Own translation from Posener, G. (1938), Catalogue des ostraca hiératiques littéraires de Deir el Médineh I, Cairo: IFAO, 15, pl 31 and 31a and Smither, P. (1941), ‘A Ramesside Love Charm’, JEA 27, 131-132.

Colledge, S. L. (2015), The Process of Cursing in Ancient Egypt. PhD thesis. University of Liverpool. Available at: https://www.academia.edu/29127849/The_Process_of_Cursing_in_Ancient_Egypt (Accessed: 19/2/17)

Tomb of Khety (Herakleopolitan Period at Siut)

As for any dissident or any ignorant who will overturn (the tomb endowment) after this which he has heard, [his] name will not exist, [he will not] be buried in the necropolis, he will be cooked together with criminals, who the god has planted obstacles against, [his] local god rejects him, and his town rejects him.

Own translation from Griffith, F. Ll. (1889), The Inscriptions of Siût and Dêr Rîfeh, London: Trubner, and Edel, E. (1984), Die Inschriften der Grabfronten der Siut-Gráber in Mittelägypten aus der Herakleopolitenzeit, Opladen: Westdeutscher Verlag.

Colledge, S. L. (2015), The Process of Cursing in Ancient Egypt. PhD thesis. University of Liverpool. Available at: https://www.academia.edu/29127849/The_Process_of_Cursing_in_Ancient_Egypt (Accessed: 19/2/17)

Ostracon Deir el-Medina 1213 (Ramesside Period)

Another spell of catching a scorpion and of holding its mouth (sting) and not allowing it to bite (sting). Stand (against) the scorpion! I <will> shut and seal its mouth. If they do not stand and listen (to) my words, I <will> cut off the 78 heads which are upon the Great God who lies down […] I will chop off Horus’ hand, I will blind Seth’s eye, I will hold shut the mouth of the great Ennead, I will [set] fire [to] Busiris, I will burn Osiris, and [I will overturn] the burial which rests in the great […] Stand [… stan]d like Seth stands […] Ptah.

Own translation from Posener, G. (1951-72), Catalogue des ostraca hiératiques littéraires de Deir el Médineh II, Cairo: IFAO, 28, pl. 48 and 48a, and Borghouts, J. F. (1978), Ancient Egyptian Magical Texts, Leiden: Brill, 76.

Colledge, S. L. (2015), The Process of Cursing in Ancient Egypt. PhD thesis. University of Liverpool. Available at: https://www.academia.edu/29127849/The_Process_of_Cursing_in_Ancient_Egypt (Accessed: 19/2/17)